List of Houston’s Best Parks > Healthtian

List of Houston’s Best Parks > Healthtian

Houston parks are beautiful place for outdoor opportunities and places to play to unleash all that pent-up energy. Whether you’re looking for a splash zone, sports fields, or something in between, you’ll never have a hard time finding great parks in Houston for sunbathing and fun.

Houston has so many parks that it would be impossible to list them all, but read below for our roundup of the best parks in and around Houston city:

1. Buffalo Bayou State Park

2. Evelyn Park

3. Levy Park

4. Emancipation Park

5. Buffalo Bend Nature Park

 

1. Buffalo Bayou State Park

Is located in the heart of 1800 Allen Pkwy. and Memorial Dr., River Oaks .

This park is the beating heart of the city’s main artery, Buffalo Bayou, green space built along 10 miles of waterways in a $58 million project, nice and beautiful place to be.

Explore the water in a kayak or pontoon boat; hike the Kinder Trails; take the kids to the Barbara Fish Daniel Nature Playground; bike the Sandy Reed Memorial Trail and have a great fun.

All kinds of Houstonians, but especially the young people of the Inner Loop, who love the great entertainment opportunities so close to the city.

When to go : It depends on what you’re looking for. On weekends and weeknights, the park is a scene, with lots of foot, bike, and dog traffic, but on weekdays it’s quieter, perfect for quiet contemplation.

2. Evelyn Park

This park, which opened last year, pays homage to the Teas Nursery, which occupied the acreage for more than 100 years, filling its path-lined landscape with a wide variety of flowers and other flora.

What to do : The 5-acre park hosts food trucks, farmers’ markets, free fitness classes, and other fun, family-friendly events on its center lawn.

Whom you’ll find there : lunch ladies and farm grannies (the park is perfect for leisurely strolls).

On Sunday mornings for breakfast at one of the park’s Yellow House pop-up cafe concepts, whose oak-shaded patio offers a picturesque view of the park.

3. Levy Park

In the early 2000s, the Upper Kirby Management District took over the upkeep of this previously neglected park, built in 1941, and has recently undergone multi-year renovations.

What to do : An outdoor reading room, plus weekly public piano concerts, story times from the Houston Public Library, and poetry workshops for teens, make this 4-acre park a green space that makes it a cultural destination.

Who You’ll Find There : Proud parents of human and fur babies alike (the huge playground and two dog parks are a big draw); community gardeners and composters.

On Saturday mornings; work up an appetite at the 8:30am boot camp or 10:00am yoga class (both free), then head across the street to the huge Eastside Farmers Market and grab your swag for breakfast at a picnic (yes, we are).

4. Emancipation Park

3018 Emancipation Avenue, Third Ward

Why We Like It : A $33 million overhaul of Houston’s first public park, created in 1872, has brought with it all-new facilities, including a gleaming new pool with two spinning slides.

What to do : The park’s fitness center offers everything from a weight room and an indoor gym to weekly Zumba classes and line dancing.

Who You’ll Find There : Athletes and teens, all taking advantage of the lighted basketball and tennis courts and softball fields.

When to Go : Any day you can catch the RO Seafood Boiler Shack (2901 Emancipation Ave.) and the Crumbville, TX Bakery (2316 Elgin St.) open on the same day. He grabs takeout of fried shrimp po-boys from Chef Wendell Price’s restaurant to enjoy in the park, then entices the kids to finally leave the park with the promise of Ella Russell’s famous “stuffed cups,” muffins with a baked cookie inside.

5. Buffalo Bend Nature Park 

Recently renamed Buffalo Bend Yolanda Black Navarro Nature Park (a tongue twister!) in honor of the East End’s committed civic leader, this 3.5-acre park was built in 2016 from the remains of a construction site near the Port of Houston’s Turning Basin.

What to do : Stroll through reconstructed wetlands that are intended to mimic the area’s original pre-industry landscape and get a totally different view of Buffalo Bayou.

Who You’ll Find There : Solitude seekers and bird watchers, who can regularly see black-bellied whistling ducks, great blue herons, white ibises, and other migratory species.

When to Go : Weekday afternoons, when bustling Buffalo Bayou Park is packed, and you’re looking for an evening stroll that’s more wildlife-viewing than people-watching.

 

List of Houston’s Best Parks

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.